Rising Hill and Northview Elementary Schools

RISING HILL AND NORTHVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS
RISING HILL AND NORTHVIEW ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Rising Hill and Northview Elementary Schools

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

  • North Kansas City School District
  • New Construction
  • Rising Hill: $20 million & 58,000 SF
  • Northview: $21.7 million & 70,900 SF
  • LEED Certified

Designed in tandem, Rising Hill and Northview Elementary Schools provide flexible, collaborative spaces that serve every type of learner.

Reinforcing a district-wide emphasis on literacy, the heart of these two schools are spacious, exposed media centers that push the envelope of a traditional library. Students have opportunities to gather on a learning stair for lessons, collaborate in smaller groups, or focus in a nook on an independent project or to enjoy their favorite book.

The academic neighborhoods set the stage for differentiated learning, accommodating every type of lesson and learner. Classrooms with garage doors are adjacent to collaborative spaces, amplifying space for group activities, breakout sessions or individualized learning. Writeable locker surfaces give students a sense of pride and ownership of their space, reinforcing an environment that is truly designed for the students.

As a forward-thinking district, the two elementary schools contain individual, single occupancy bathroom stalls that promote safety and privacy to ensure that every student feels comfortable in their environment.

Brookwood Elementary School

BROOKWOOD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

LEAWOOD, KANSAS

  • Shawnee Mission School District
  • New Construction
  • 76,800 SF
  • $17.3 Million

The walls and floors come to life as avenues for learning and exploration.

Home to over 550 students, the Brookwood Beaver pride shines through in the building’s design. The original mascot, Oscar, is incorporated throughout the building, a nod to proud alumni of the previous Brookwood Elementary School. A mixture of colors and texture mimic those found in nature, and you’ll find a beaver den nestled under the learning stairs that provides a special place for students to socialize or study.

The built environment at Brookwood encourages learning through exploration. As students make their way through the corridors, subtle wayfinding cues and interactive environmental graphics inspire student engagement and spark inquiry. Beyond the interior walls are learning tools integrated onto the building’s façade – a central sun dial and diagram of the lunar phases.

Cassell Park Elementary School

CASSELL PARK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

INDEPENDENCE, MISSOURI

  • Independence School District
  • New Construction
  • 69,000 SF
  • $20 Million

Complete project integration, from architectural design to brand development. 

The Independence School District needed a new elementary school to prevent overcrowding and eliminate all mobile trailers used in the district. Named after a community landmark and prestigious community figure, students and staff now have a permanent place to call home at Cassell Park Elementary.

Now Home of the Knights, students and teachers take pride in their newly branded identity, which is displayed throughout the school through prominent graphics. Just like a knight, the school represents a safe, protective space while exploring a more collaborative, flexible approach to learning.

Cassell Park is the first elementary in the district to pilot Project Lead the Way into its curriculum. A makerspace is seamlessly integrated into the media center with a retractable door, making hands-on learning visible for all to see.

Olathe West High School

Olathe West High School

OLATHE, KANSAS

  • Olathe USD 233
  • New Construction
  • 375,000 SF
  • $85 million
  • Design Partner: Stantec Architecture

Learning is on display at this one-of-a-kind high school.

From the moment students walk in the door, they’re greeted with the media center and the 21st Century Learning program labs. Student socialization and collaboration are encouraged with two learning stairs connecting academic neighborhoods.

Academic neighborhoods house a variety of spaces from flexible labs to blended learning environments, giving the school a more collegiate feel. No teacher owns their classroom, but rather chooses the environment that will work best for that day’s lesson.

AWARDS & RECOGNITION

  • AIA Kansas – Citation Award in Large Architecture
  • A4LE Midwest Great Lakes – John Shaw Award

Liberty North High School

Liberty North High School Additions

LIBERTY, MISSOURI

  • Liberty Public Schools
  • Additions
  • 42,000 SF total
  • $9 million

This addition embraces a new way of learning for the District. Flexible learning spaces create a culture of collaboration that is unlike any other part of the building.

The existing high school is a traditional learning environment with conventional classrooms that branch off central corridors. With the two-story addition, the District wanted to do more with less – more opportunities for learning in the smaller addition. So, every space is a space for learning. Corridors include furniture that can be used for break-out groups or one-on-one instruction, and classrooms are highly flexible to encourage a variety of teaching styles.

St. Michael the Archangel Catholic High School

St. Michael the Archangel Catholic High School

LEE’S SUMMIT, MISSOURI

  • Diocese of Kansas City – St. Joseph
  • New Construction
  • 90,000 SF
  • $25 million
  • Religious Design Partner: SFS Architecture

Traditional values meet innovative learning where students get a well-rounded education in a space that marries religious teachings with brain-based learning.

This new Kansas City Diocese school combines the former St. Mary’s and Archbishop O’Hara high schools into one cohesive learning environment. A large atrium connects the chapel and academic spaces with a two-story learning stair, which encourages collaboration and community. The classrooms’ traditional style is complemented by flexible furniture that allow the spaces to adapt to each day’s teaching schedule.

wood-steps

This new high school marries traditional religious education values with brain-based learning. The learning environments are designed to put an emphasis on collaboration and technology. The classrooms are a traditional orientation, but outfitted with flexible, modular furniture to allow the space to be adaptive. The building is designed around a large, brightly lit atrium, which serves as the main commons. From the atrium, visitors can see the learning stair, a collaborative space for students to gather, which leads to the school’s lower level and the heart of the school, the chapel.

Summit Ridge Middle School

Summit Ridge
Summit Ridge

Summit Ridge Middle School

LITTLETON, COLORADO

  • Jefferson County Public Schools
  • Addition/Renovation
  •  13,000 SF
  • $4.8 million

Visual connectivity and strategically designed collaborative spaces have led to an evolution of learning styles at this newly combined middle school. 

Jeffco Public Schools in Denver, Colorado recently decided to transition their sixth-grade students into middle-school, and needed to accommodate for the addition of 400 students. The existing building hosted traditional classrooms and learning areas, challenging the design team to seamlessly integrate the two buildings while incorporating collaborative learning elements into the addition. Hollis + Miller worked directly with the principal, faculty, community members, and students to create a design that would introduce collaboration spaces and a learning stair alongside new classrooms and science labs. Renovations to the school’s STEAM classrooms allow more students access to hands on education with computer aided design, engineering, and fabrication.