Soaring Heights Elementary School

Soaring Heights Elementary School

JOPLIN, MISSOURI

  • Joplin School District
  • New Construction
  • 66,500 SF total
  • $13.5 million

One-of-a-kind collaborative spaces encourage impromptu idea sharing and intimate one-on-one learning.

The Learning Park, Tree House and Theatre in the Park are all flexible learning spaces unique to Soaring Heights. The flexible design emboldens educators and students to adapt their learning environment to the lesson.

This school replaces the elementary school lost on May 22, 2011, when the worst tornado disaster on record to date in the United States hit the City of Joplin.

Joplin Early Childhood Center

Joplin Early Childhood Center

JOPLIN, MISSOURI

  • Joplin School District
  • New Construction
  • 37,500 SF
  • $8.7 million

After seven years in temporary classrooms, Joplin’s littlest learners finally have a home for learning and exploring. This is “Where it all Begins…”

Teachers can now collaborate together to utilize shared learning centers that are integral to their early education curriculum, rather than having to house these centers in their classrooms, which has freed up space in their rooms for more individual and group learning.

It was important for the Joplin community that their Early Childhood Center feels more like a home than a school to ease the transition for students. This space comes alive thanks to the integration of the environmental graphics. Students and visitors are immersed in a forest of trees and critters. The Learning Grove opens learners’ imaginations with construction and waterplay stations, as well as a tricycle track, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor learning.

In May 2011, an F-5 tornado struck the city of Joplin, devastating the community. The District’s early childhood center is the last piece of Operation Rebuild.

AWARDS & RECOGNITION

  • IIDA Mid-America – Silver Award in K-12 Education
  • AIA Kansas City – Citation Award in Interior Architecture

Joplin Early Childhood Center

JOPLIN, MISSOURI

  • Joplin School District
  • New Construction
  • 37,500 SF
  • $8.7 million

After seven years in temporary classrooms, Joplin’s littlest learners finally have a home for learning and exploring. This is “Where it all Begins…”

Teachers can now collaborate together to utilize shared learning centers that are integral to their early education curriculum, rather than having to house these centers in their classrooms, which has freed up space in their rooms for more individual and group learning.

It was important for the Joplin community that their Early Childhood Center feels more like a home than a school to ease the transition for students. This space comes alive thanks to the integration of the environmental graphics. Students and visitors are immersed in a forest of trees and critters. The Learning Grove opens learners’ imaginations with construction and waterplay stations, as well as a tricycle track, blurring the lines between indoor and outdoor learning.

In May 2011, an F-5 tornado struck the city of Joplin, devastating the community. The District’s early childhood center is the last piece of Operation Rebuild.

Trailwood Elementary School

Trailwood Elementary School

OVERLAND PARK, KANSAS

  • Shawnee Mission School District
  • New Construction
  • 68,000 SF total
  • $16.9 million

Every space is an opportunity for learning. Described as a “dream school,” Trailwood focuses on hands-on, experiential learning.

Corridors that would traditionally be meant for travel are transformed into work areas with soft seating, tables and easily accessible technology. Accommodating 550 students grades pre-kindergarten through fifth grade, the Principal and community are excited about the possibilities this unique design provides.

Safety was a paramount concern throughout the design and construction because this new elementary school was built next to the existing facility, which stayed open and operational throughout construction. Careful coordination between the District, our team and JE Dunn’s construction team was paramount to ensure students and faculty at the existing school stayed safe and secure.

Hopewell Elementary School

HOPEWELL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

  • Park Hill School District
  • New Construction
  • 73,000 SF
  • $18.1 million

Indoor and outdoor exploration are encouraged through colorful environmental graphics, reinforced by nature.

Positioned atop a hill and nestled within trees, Park Hill School District’s new Hopewell Elementary is a sanctuary for discovery. 600 students, grades K-5, have the opportunity to use every square foot inside and out of the building for learning. Traditional hallways have been molded with flexible collaboration spaces to maximize flexibility and efficiency. Every core classroom has their own glass garage door, allowing teachers the opportunity to open into collaboration and project spaces. The art room looks out upon a patio facing the tree line, inspiring creativity in students and spilling natural light into the learning environment. The durable materials used on the exterior of the building will withstand the elements and provide a timeless look for generations of students to come in the future.

Briarwood Elementary School

Briarwood Elementary School

PRAIRIE VILLAGE, KANSAS

  • Shawnee Mission School District
  • New Construction
  • 72,000 SF
  • $16.7 million

The walls come alive to inspire young learners at this new school. Whimsical landscapes and playful typography encourage students to open their minds to new possibilities.

Focusing on brain-based learning, every space at this new elementary school accommodates experiential learning. Corridors are learning spaces, with seating for large and small-group collaboration and integrated technology.

Safety was a paramount concern throughout the design and construction because this new elementary school was built next to the existing facility, which stayed open and operational throughout construction. Careful coordination between the District, our team and JE Dunn’s construction team was paramount to ensure students and faculty at the existing school stayed safe and secure.

Grain Valley High School

GRAIN VALLEY HIGH SCHOOL

GRAIN VALLEY, MISSOURI

  • Grain Valley School District
  • Addition-Phase 4
  • 33,400 SF & 17,600 SF Courtyard
  • $10.2 million

A new face for Grain Valley High School provides a prominent sense of arrival and display of school pride.

Upon arrival at Grain Valley High School, students and visitors are guided in along the impressive, curved, blue CMU wall that begins at the entry and continues throughout the interior, comprising the spine of the building and dubbed “Eagle Way”. The raised entrance increases visibility from the street while improving traffic flow for student drop-off and pick-up.

Similar to a central college campus union, the media center represents the heart of the school, branded by a large glass eagle graphic that is visible from both inside and out. Glass dividers promote connectivity to the lecture hall, makerspace and small group collaboration rooms while providing views into the expansive courtyard. Tiered seating in the courtyard provides an outdoor learning area and offers dynamic spaces for students to socialize.

Grain Valley High School is currently home to nearly 1,100 students but is master planned to accommodate up to 1,600 high school students in the rapidly growing community. While working with the district throughout a five-phase master plan, Hollis + Miller became very familiar with the goals and priorities of the district and community.

Ellen Ochoa Elementary School

Ellen Ochoa Elementary School

TULSA, OKLAHOMA

  • Union Public Schools
  • New Construction
  • 133,000 SF total
  • (Phase I: 70,000 SF, Phase 2: 14,000 SF., Phase 3: 49,000 SF)
  • $31 million

A tight-knit community centers around the new Ellen Ochoa Elementary.

This new school is deeply embedded in its surrounding neighborhoods, with the majority of the population living within a one-mile radius of the school. Spaces for community events, including open gyms, adult education and a community garden and kitchen, where parents and students can learn to grow and cook together.

The educational spaces open out into shared collaboration spaces and the central media space, blurring the lines of the traditional definition of a classroom. Classrooms incorporate a shared “Dream Space” dedicated to focused learning and small-group work.

Named after astronaut Dr. Ellen Ochoa, this elementary school is unlike any other in the district.

Heartland Middle School

Heartland Middle School

In Association with Frankfurt, Short, Bruza

EDMOND, OKLAHOMA

  • Edmond Public Schools
  • New Construction
  • 150,000 SF
  • $27 million

Learning happens outside traditional academic neighborhoods. An outdoor classroom and an exterior courtyard encourage students to take learning outside.

Designing for middle school students presents unique challenges because these young adults are five years removed from teddy bears but five years away from driving. They’re in the process of significant developmental changes, so flexible spaces that encourage adaptable teaching methods for every type of learner are critical.

Looking for opportunities to take students outside of the traditional classroom was a priority for Edmond Public Schools’ newest middle school.

Heartland Middle School

In Association with Frankfurt, Short, Bruza

EDMOND PUBLIC SCHOOLS

  • Edmond, Oklahoma
  • New Construction
  • 150,000 sq. ft.
  • $27 million

Learning happens outside traditional academic neighborhoods. An outdoor classroom and an exterior courtyard encourage students to take learning outside.

Designing for middle school students presents unique challenges because these young adults are five years removed from teddy bears but five years away from driving. They’re in the process of significant developmental changes, so flexible spaces that encourage adaptable teaching methods for every type of learner are critical.

Looking for opportunities to take students outside of the traditional classroom was a priority for Edmond Public Schools’ newest middle school.

Academic areas are specific to every type of learner and include:

  • performance based
  • project based
  • elevated and casual/social learning

Millcreek Campus

Millcreek Campus
Millcreek Campus

Millcreek Campus

OLATHE, KANSAS

  • Olathe USD 233
  • Addition & Renovation
  • 98,000 SF
  • $16 million

Learners of all ages – toddler to adult – now feel at home at the renamed Millcreek Campus. This multi-generational learning environment houses several of the District’s community and alternative learning programs. With all these generations meeting in this one space, collaborative learning is taken to the next level.

The Parents as Teachers program hosts parents of young children for playgroups and child development support. Flexible learning environments and specialized spaces allow middle and high school students with special circumstances the opportunity to catch up or stay on track with their schoolwork, and adult education classroom spaces offer community members the opportunity to expand their career opportunities.

This historic campus was previously known as the John P. St. John Memorial High School, originally built in 1926. This outdated facility housed many of these educational and community programs in three separate buildings. Our design team worked with the District’s educational partners to reimagine the campus, starting with an addition that connects the buildings and allows for more collaboration and engagement. Today, the space welcomes learners of every generation– making it a learning environment like no other.

Three Trails Preschool

Three Trails Preschool

RAYTOWN, MISSOURI

  • Raytown Quality Schools
  • Renovation
  • 32,600 SF
  • $2 million

Young learners are immersed in a bright, positive environment from the moment they enter this revamped environment. 

Each space comes alive with colorful nature scenes featuring animal friends on every wall. Students feel engaged and excited to learn in this updated learning environment. This abandoned Catholic school was given new life for its students and teachers.

Raytown Quality Schools was looking to expand its early childhood program after the overwhelming success of its first pre-kindergarten facility. Reimagining the interior of this tired school allows more preschool students the opportunity to start learning earlier, which research has shown leads to improved success throughout their academic and professional lives.