Briarwood Elementary School

Briarwood Elementary School

PRAIRIE VILLAGE, KANSAS

  • Shawnee Mission School District
  • New Construction
  • 72,000 SF
  • $16.7 million

The walls come alive to inspire young learners at this new school. Whimsical landscapes and playful typography encourage students to open their minds to new possibilities.

Focusing on brain-based learning, every space at this new elementary school accommodates experiential learning. Corridors are learning spaces, with seating for large and small-group collaboration and integrated technology.

Safety was a paramount concern throughout the design and construction because this new elementary school was built next to the existing facility, which stayed open and operational throughout construction. Careful coordination between the District, our team and JE Dunn’s construction team was paramount to ensure students and faculty at the existing school stayed safe and secure.

Ellen Ochoa Elementary School

Ellen Ochoa Elementary School

TULSA, OKLAHOMA

  • Union Public Schools
  • New Construction
  • 133,000 SF total
  • (Phase I: 70,000 SF, Phase 2: 14,000 SF., Phase 3: 49,000 SF)
  • $31 million

A tight-knit community centers around the new Ellen Ochoa Elementary.

This new school is deeply embedded in its surrounding neighborhoods, with the majority of the population living within a one-mile radius of the school. Spaces for community events, including open gyms, adult education and a community garden and kitchen, where parents and students can learn to grow and cook together.

The educational spaces open out into shared collaboration spaces and the central media space, blurring the lines of the traditional definition of a classroom. Classrooms incorporate a shared “Dream Space” dedicated to focused learning and small-group work.

Named after astronaut Dr. Ellen Ochoa, this elementary school is unlike any other in the district.

Heartland Middle School

Heartland Middle School

In Association with Frankfurt, Short, Bruza

EDMOND, OKLAHOMA

  • Edmond Public Schools
  • New Construction
  • 150,000 SF
  • $27 million

Learning happens outside traditional academic neighborhoods. An outdoor classroom and an exterior courtyard encourage students to take learning outside.

Designing for middle school students presents unique challenges because these young adults are five years removed from teddy bears but five years away from driving. They’re in the process of significant developmental changes, so flexible spaces that encourage adaptable teaching methods for every type of learner are critical.

Looking for opportunities to take students outside of the traditional classroom was a priority for Edmond Public Schools’ newest middle school.

Heartland Middle School

In Association with Frankfurt, Short, Bruza

EDMOND PUBLIC SCHOOLS

  • Edmond, Oklahoma
  • New Construction
  • 150,000 sq. ft.
  • $27 million

Learning happens outside traditional academic neighborhoods. An outdoor classroom and an exterior courtyard encourage students to take learning outside.

Designing for middle school students presents unique challenges because these young adults are five years removed from teddy bears but five years away from driving. They’re in the process of significant developmental changes, so flexible spaces that encourage adaptable teaching methods for every type of learner are critical.

Looking for opportunities to take students outside of the traditional classroom was a priority for Edmond Public Schools’ newest middle school.

Academic areas are specific to every type of learner and include:

  • performance based
  • project based
  • elevated and casual/social learning

EPiC Elementary School

education design

EPiC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

LIBERTY, MISSOURI

  • Liberty Public Schools
  • Adaptive Reuse
  • 30,000 SF
  • $1.8 Million

Re-imagining a former administrative building created innovative environments for all elementary school students while saving District resources and accommodating rapid population growth. Students at EPiC are encouraged to push the boundaries of what an educational space can be.

The team set out to do more with less, designing spaces that were flexible and multi-functional and support learning at all times. The District owned space in a nearby office building. By moving their administrative office into this space, it opened up space for a learning environment without the expense of designing a new building.

The former District Administrative Center was re-imagined into EPiC Elementary School, an innovative project-based learning environment where “Every Person is Inspired to Create.” Designed to support 300 students, EPiC looks at space differently than a traditional school. Every square foot of the building is viewed as a learning space, supporting student group work.  Hollis + Miller designed flexible, multipurpose classrooms where students are exposed to project-based learning and educational technology. The learning environment also fosters individual learning and encourages discovery. This is an environment where children choose their adventure and have the opportunity to learn however they learn best.

I really felt comfortable explaining my ideas to Hollis + Miller, and the best part was that they would take our ideas and expand upon them.

–Dr. Michelle Schmitz

Lenexa City Center Library

Lenexa City Center Library

In association with Holzman Moss Bottino Architecture

LENEXA, KANSAS

  • Johnson County Library System
  • New Construction
  • 40,000 SF
  • $15 Million

The new Lenexa City Center Library is a source of inspiration, innovation and experiences that will enrich the surrounding community.

Located in the heart of Lenexa’s contemporary city center, this development is helping establish a new downtown for the city. Adjacent to a city hall, community center, restaurants and public market, the library welcomes all members of the community.

To achieve total flexibility, the majority of the library is an open loft-like space that houses the adult, teen, and juvenile collections on two levels. A two-story atrium serves as the living room for the community. Three large flexible meeting spaces and four smaller meeting spaces can be utilized by both library staff and community members and will provide access to technology for community groups, tutoring, and collaborative discussions. Patron convenience is at the forefront of the library’s automated conveyance system that allows patrons to both pick up holds and drop off returns via a drive-thru in the parking garage. The new library incorporates a service model designed to enhance public access to the collections, focus services to patrons, and integrate patron self-service strategies and staff mobility.

This new library is meant to engage the community. The Community commons visually connects to the civic plaza, street, and public market. The upper and lower entries allow for ease of patron access from both the Civic Center and Public Plaza.

Thirty-foot high towering glass and zinc shingled walls fold across two sides of the building and allow for connectivity between the outdoor plaza and library patrons. These folding walls are unified by a curving railing that weaves between the interior and exterior of the building. This ribbon-like railing draws patrons walking along the public plaza toward the library’s two entrances.

Summit Ridge Middle School

Summit Ridge
Summit Ridge

Summit Ridge Middle School

LITTLETON, COLORADO

  • Jefferson County Public Schools
  • Addition/Renovation
  •  13,000 SF
  • $4.8 million

Visual connectivity and strategically designed collaborative spaces have led to an evolution of learning styles at this newly combined middle school. 

Jeffco Public Schools in Denver, Colorado recently decided to transition their sixth-grade students into middle-school, and needed to accommodate for the addition of 400 students. The existing building hosted traditional classrooms and learning areas, challenging the design team to seamlessly integrate the two buildings while incorporating collaborative learning elements into the addition. Hollis + Miller worked directly with the principal, faculty, community members, and students to create a design that would introduce collaboration spaces and a learning stair alongside new classrooms and science labs. Renovations to the school’s STEAM classrooms allow more students access to hands on education with computer aided design, engineering, and fabrication.

Ervin Early Learning Center

Ervin Early Learning Center

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

  • Hickman Mills School District
  • Renovation
  • 110,000 SF total
  • $7.5 million

Repurposing an abandoned middle school gave pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students a space their own focused on literacy.

Research shows that students who do not have an early education focused on literacy are more likely to struggle throughout school and into adulthood. This dedicated brain-based facility for young learners allowed the District to put an emphasis on this issue without committing more square footage to Kindergarten. It also gave the District more classroom space within each elementary school for older grade levels.

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