EPiC Elementary School

education design

EPiC ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

LIBERTY, MISSOURI

  • Liberty Public Schools
  • Adaptive Reuse
  • 30,000 SF
  • $1.8 Million

Re-imagining a former administrative building created innovative environments for all elementary school students while saving District resources and accommodating rapid population growth. Students at EPiC are encouraged to push the boundaries of what an educational space can be.

The team set out to do more with less, designing spaces that were flexible and multi-functional and support learning at all times. The District owned space in a nearby office building. By moving their administrative office into this space, it opened up space for a learning environment without the expense of designing a new building.

The former District Administrative Center was re-imagined into EPiC Elementary School, an innovative project-based learning environment where “Every Person is Inspired to Create.” Designed to support 300 students, EPiC looks at space differently than a traditional school. Every square foot of the building is viewed as a learning space, supporting student group work.  Hollis + Miller designed flexible, multipurpose classrooms where students are exposed to project-based learning and educational technology. The learning environment also fosters individual learning and encourages discovery. This is an environment where children choose their adventure and have the opportunity to learn however they learn best.

I really felt comfortable explaining my ideas to Hollis + Miller, and the best part was that they would take our ideas and expand upon them.

–Dr. Michelle Schmitz

Ervin Early Learning Center

Ervin Early Learning Center

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

  • Hickman Mills School District
  • Renovation
  • 110,000 SF total
  • $7.5 million

Repurposing an abandoned middle school gave pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students a space their own focused on literacy.

Research shows that students who do not have an early education focused on literacy are more likely to struggle throughout school and into adulthood. This dedicated brain-based facility for young learners allowed the District to put an emphasis on this issue without committing more square footage to Kindergarten. It also gave the District more classroom space within each elementary school for older grade levels.

ervin-wide

East Middle School

East Middle School
East Middle School

East Middle School

JOPLIN, MISSOURI

  • Joplin School District
  • New Construction
  • 125,800 SF total
  • $30.4 million

A shared building with a well-defined threshold eases the transition from elementary to middle school, while a bold, vibrant color palette set this young adult space apart from elementary.

Sharing a site with Soaring Heights Elementary School, it’s important that the architecture, design and environmental graphics emphasize the maturity, focus and confidence that comes with young adulthood.

This school replaces the middle school lost on May 22, 2011, when the worst tornado disaster on record to date in the United States hit to the City of Joplin. The Superintendent called this effort “Operation Rebuild.”

Summit Ridge Middle School

Summit Ridge
Summit Ridge

Summit Ridge Middle School

LITTLETON, COLORADO

  • Jefferson County Public Schools
  • Addition/Renovation
  •  13,000 SF
  • $4.8 million

Visual connectivity and strategically designed collaborative spaces have led to an evolution of learning styles at this newly combined middle school. 

Jeffco Public Schools in Denver, Colorado recently decided to transition their sixth-grade students into middle-school, and needed to accommodate for the addition of 400 students. The existing building hosted traditional classrooms and learning areas, challenging the design team to seamlessly integrate the two buildings while incorporating collaborative learning elements into the addition. Hollis + Miller worked directly with the principal, faculty, community members, and students to create a design that would introduce collaboration spaces and a learning stair alongside new classrooms and science labs. Renovations to the school’s STEAM classrooms allow more students access to hands on education with computer aided design, engineering, and fabrication.

Olathe West High School

Olathe West High School

OLATHE, KANSAS

  • Olathe USD 233
  • New Construction
  • 375,000 SF
  • $85 million
  • Design Partner: Stantec Architecture

Learning is on display at this one-of-a-kind high school.

From the moment students walk in the door, they’re greeted with the media center and the 21st Century Learning program labs. Student socialization and collaboration are encouraged with two learning stairs connecting academic neighborhoods.

Academic neighborhoods house a variety of spaces from flexible labs to blended learning environments, giving the school a more collegiate feel. No teacher owns their classroom, but rather chooses the environment that will work best for that day’s lesson.

AWARDS & RECOGNITION

  • AIA Kansas – Citation Award in Large Architecture
  • A4LE Midwest Great Lakes – John Shaw Award

Liberty North High School

Liberty North High School Additions

LIBERTY, MISSOURI

  • Liberty Public Schools
  • Additions
  • 42,000 SF total
  • $9 million

This addition embraces a new way of learning for the District. Flexible learning spaces create a culture of collaboration that is unlike any other part of the building.

The existing high school is a traditional learning environment with conventional classrooms that branch off central corridors. With the two-story addition, the District wanted to do more with less – more opportunities for learning in the smaller addition. So, every space is a space for learning. Corridors include furniture that can be used for break-out groups or one-on-one instruction, and classrooms are highly flexible to encourage a variety of teaching styles.

St. Michael the Archangel Catholic High School

St. Michael the Archangel Catholic High School

LEE’S SUMMIT, MISSOURI

  • Diocese of Kansas City – St. Joseph
  • New Construction
  • 90,000 SF
  • $25 million
  • Religious Design Partner: SFS Architecture

Traditional values meet innovative learning where students get a well-rounded education in a space that marries religious teachings with brain-based learning.

This new Kansas City Diocese school combines the former St. Mary’s and Archbishop O’Hara high schools into one cohesive learning environment. A large atrium connects the chapel and academic spaces with a two-story learning stair, which encourages collaboration and community. The classrooms’ traditional style is complemented by flexible furniture that allow the spaces to adapt to each day’s teaching schedule.